Want to write a book?

Is there an idea for a story that’s been floating around in your head for a couple of years? Or perhaps you’ve been in the middle of reading a novel, and thought to yourself I could do this. I could write a book as good as this one. An article published in the New York Times cited a survey that had an astounding 81% of Americans who feel they have a book in them that they’re dying to write. If you’re one of them, why not consider following through?

How to write Jane Rosenthal

You no longer have to work deep into the night, tapping on an old-fashioned typewriter and ripping out the page if you decide to cut a passage. For the most part, all computers and laptops come equipped with a word processing program that makes it easy to type, edit and store your work. Below are some more tips from professional writers on how to turn that idea for the next Great American Novel into a reality.

How to be a writer
  • Think about a story that you simply must tell. Instead of shooting for whatever is trending in the market (IE: a book about a mortal girl falling in love with a handsome vampire), stick with a story that comes from your own creative mind. Doing so will make your work stand out among the competition rather than appearing like of a copycat version of someone else’s original idea.
  • Become a sponge. Good character development in your novel requires you to get into the mindset of the people you’re writing about. And you need to understand their lifestyles as well. So don’t be shy about trying out new experiences and asking lots of questions of new people you meet. You’d be surprised how much you can learn about others by simply becoming an excellent observer and listener.
  • Write for the right reasons. The most successful writers are driven to write, often for the pleasure of the process itself. If every time you sit down at the computer is an exercise in discipline and the whole thing feels like a chore, you may not be suited for the profession. Not to mention that it is damned hard to get published, so patience is key. Looking for instant results in the form of accolades or money is not realistic.
  • Set aside a specific time in an environment conducive to creating. Dedicate a span of time during the day that is devoted just to writing, and try to make it during the time of day you feel most motivated, energetic and clear-headed. I don’t know about you, but for me, that time is not morning. My energy level peaks in the late afternoon and evening hours, so that’s when I sit down at the computer to create. Your surroundings are important too. I’m someone who needs to be in a home office, instrumental jazz music on the stereo and no people around to interrupt my train of thought. But I have seen authors typing furiously away right in the middle of a loud, busy Starbucks.
  • Write, write, write. When I looked into becoming a writer, I thought I should take classes, maybe even seek a second degree in creative writing. It turns out that the only way to become a better writer is to practice as much and as often as you can. You’d be surprised at how your first attempt compares to your second or third. No amount of classroom instruction can be a substitute for honing your skills through repetition.
Learn to write a book

I encourage anyone who has the desire to try sitting down and putting their story on paper. To me, it is food for the soul, whether or not anyone else ever reads my material or not. And who knows? You may be an undiscovered talent, just waiting to be heard.