How Mexicans honor the Virgin Mary

The Virgin Mary is a powerful national religious symbol in Mexico, where she’s often honored with rituals and celebrations. As one one of Mexico’s most beloved patron saints, Mary is also referred to as Our Lady of Guadalupe. She is a big part of the Mexican identity and faith, and her image is associated with important issues, like motherhood, feminism and social justice. The events of her life are demarcated in many different ways throughout the year, including celebrating her arrival in heaven on August 15th, “Assumption Day”.

Celebrating the day Mary ascended to heaven

Dia de la Asuncion de Maria,  is based on the belief that when Mary died, her body did not undergo the normal process of physical decay, but instead was “assumed” directly into heaven and reunited with her soul. To this day, on August 15th, churches all over Mexico give masses and hold feasts dedicated to this event. Many towns and villages put on processions or parades, often lead by someone holding a statue of her image. Others carry banners and roses, the flower that has special meaning in the legend of how Mary became known as Our Lady of Guadalupe. 

Juan Diego and Mary

Juan Diego was a peasant who lived in Mexico in the 16th century. The legend goes that he was visited in December several times by an apparition of Mary. Diego went to the archbishop of Mexico City to speak of what he’d seen and was met with disbelief. But when Juan returned to report a second visit from Mary, the archbishop requested proof. He told Juan to go back to the place where he’d seen her and request that Mary provide a symbol, an actual miraculous sign that would show that Diego was telling the truth. 

Upon relaying the message, Mary instructed Juan to go the top of a hill and gather flowers. Not expecting to find any, as it was the middle of winter, he found non-native Castilian roses in full bloom. Mary filled his cloak with the flowers, and Juan traveled back to show the archbishop the unusual site. When he opened the cloak and the roses fell to the ground, the material underneath was adorned with an image of the Virgin Mary. The archbishop displayed the cloth in church for public display, and on her last visit to Juan Diego, Mary told him she wished to be known under the name of Guadalupe. 

Today, the Basilica of Guadalupe stands on the site where Our Lady is believed to have appeared in front of Juan Diego. Everywhere you go in Mexico, you’re likely to spot a statue, painting or image of the Virgin Mary. She is revered both as a religious symbol and even more, as a universal symbol of all that is good in the world.